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Sharing the latest news on Alzheimer's & memory loss. Visit www.TheADplan.com or www.TheAlzheimersDiet.com for more information

CTAD 2012: Clinical Trials on Alzheimer’s Disease Research Highlights Focus on Alzheimer’s Diet

Posted on | November 3, 2012 | No Comments

Last week, the international Clinical Trials on Alzheimer’s disease conference (CTAD) 2012 was held. It was a very exciting conference, including updates on the importance of dietary changes in the fight against AD, the two vaccine studies (Bapineuzumab & Solanezumab), as well as more data on the reasons why certain people will be more or less likely to respond to different therapies based on their genetic code. This article reviews several of the research highlights from the meeting.

Research on Diet for AD Treatment and Prevention:

Recent research shows that AD may be effectively managed through diet and nutrition, and these non-drug dietary approaches that balance safety with scientific evidence are essential considerations for comprehensive management. In an effort to more optimally study effects of dietary patterns,  Drs. Isaacson, Ochner and R. Khan developed a comprehensive, web-based AD nutrition tracking system (AD-NTS). Interim data suggests users are highly satisfied with the current functionality and Likert scale ratings are also uniformly positive. The AD-NTS should be available for free to the general public later this year.

Additional research has tested the effect of dietary interventions for both AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI, or “pre”-Alzheimer’s disease). It is essential for clinicians to be aware of this research in order to best educate and inform patients, and a presentation by Ochner, Barrios, Lee, Greer, and Isaacson used Pubmed to identify clinical trials and additional studies addressing the relation between dietary practices and memory function. Evidence, with deference to clinical trials, surrounding the use of dietary interventions for the prevention and treatment of AD and MCI was rated as: Strong, Moderate, Weak or Insufficient for the focus areas of the Mediterranean Diet, Low Carbohydrate and Low Glycemic Diet, Low Saturated Fat Diet, Antioxidants, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and Coconut Oil. The authors concluded that there is evidence in support of certain specific nutritional interventions for AD and MCI.  Moderate evidence supports the Mediterranean diet for reducing risk of developing MCI and converting from MCI to AD. There is Moderate support for the use of low carbohydrate and low saturated fat diets. The synergistic effects of these dietary combinations is reported. These diets appear relatively safe and have been associated with additional health benefits in overweight and obese individuals. Evidence of neuroprotective effects of dietary antioxidants and Omega-3 fatty acids is growing. Due to the lack of empirical evidence and potential for adverse effects (atherosclerosis and hypercholesterolemia), there is Insufficient evidence (meaning, not enough research has currently been done yet to prove) for coconut oil for MCI or AD. Ultimately, there remains a clear need for further scientific evaluation of the use of dietary interventions for the treatment and prevention of AD. There is a particular need for clinical trials to determine whether the dietary interventions discussed here have a definitive causal role in protecting and/or regaining memory function.

When it comes to AD treatment, there are several recent studies that show that when patients with AD or MCI change their diets significantly (most significantly, decreasing the total amount of cabohydrates that they eat), that memory scores improve (Craft and colleagues, Archives of Neurology, June 2011) In a study by Krikorian and colleagues (published in Neurobiology of Aging, December 2010), in addition to memory improvements, patients also had improved blood sugar levels, had less insulin resistance and also lost weight.

Genetics play a role in the Effectiveness of AD therapies for Treatment and Prevention:

The term “Pharmacogenomics” refers to the fact that certain medications may work better in some people, but not as well in others, and this is based on a persons genetic code (genes from mom and dad).  The term “Nutrigenomics” refers to diet therapies that may work better in some people, but not as well in others, and this too is based on a persons genetic code (or DNA).  For example, we now know that having one copy of the APOE4 gene may decrease the chances of responding to several therapies.  Much research needs to be done to clarify these points, and note that we are not yet at the point where practitioners are able to send blood samples in order to make treatment decisions, but this may change in the future.

Alzheimer’s Gifts: Holiday Gift Ideas for Memory Loss

Posted on | November 1, 2012 | No Comments

Looking for gifts for a loved one with memory loss or Alzheimer’s, or their caregivers or family members?

Visit: www.TheADplan.com/alzheimersgifts for several great gift ideas, including books, activities & non-drug therapies (most under $20).

There are quick links to a variety of tools to help fight AD, as well as meaningful activities for patients with AD, dementia and memory loss that the whole family can enjoy.

Also, be sure to check out our new blog at www.TheADplan.com/alzheimersdietblog and subscribe to our free newsletter at www.TheADplan.com/newsletter.php.

Or, for more great gift ideas, visit: www.TherapyForMemory.org

Solanezumab Effective in Mild Alzheimers Disease: Interview with Dr. Isaacson

Posted on | October 11, 2012 | No Comments

Results released this week on the experimental Alzheimer’s drug Solanezumab were met with both excitement and skepticism by experts in the AD community. Read the excerpt below from an interview with AD specialist Dr. Richard Isaacson, Associate Professor of Clinical Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and Author of Alzheimer’s Treatment Alzheimer’s Prevention: A Patient and Family Guide, and The Alzheimer’s Diet: A Step-by-step Nutritional Approach at Memory Loss Prevention and Treatment, at the American Neurological Association meeting in Boston, MA.

This will be one of three new drugs that will be tested in the first-ever broad scale Alzheimer’s prevention studies to begin soon. While we are all excited about the possibility of a drug to one day prevent AD, in the meantime we should all pay close attention to lifestyle changes, like regular exercise and specific dietary changes, to reduce risk and improve brain and body health.

Question: What are your thoughts on the results that were released this week?

Dr. Isaacson: “As an Alzheimer’s specialist with a family history of AD, I am especially encouraged by these results. Prior to these conclusions, I was certain that there was a specific subgroup of patients that was responding to the experimental vaccine therapies [like Bapineuzumab & Solanezumab].  However, since these studies were not set up to study these specific subgroups, I was concerned that while these drugs may work for certain people, the results would not demonstrate that.  Future studies for both treatment and prevention should begin soon, building on this great progress.”

Question: What were you most excited about and why have some of your colleagues not been as impressed as you are?

Dr. Isaacson: “The most encouraging aspect was that when looked at as a large group (or using pooled results), patients with mild AD had 34 percent less decline in memory and other thinking skills that those on the placebo [no treatment]. Many of my colleagues remain skeptical of these results since the overall study was “negative”. This means that when the study was planned many years ago, much less was known about the potential of these new agents, and unfortunately the study was not planned in a way to adequately study different subgroups of patients.  It was only planned to study patients with a range of mild to moderate AD. Future studies will most likely be planned to include the most mild AD patients, as well as “pre” Alzheimer’s patients (also referred to as Mild Cognitive Impairment or MCI) as specific subgroups. This will allow for a much greater chance for the studies to be “positive” and later leading to approval as a drug by the FDA.”

Question: So are you saying that if these studies were planned differently, to include the most mild patients or even those with pre-Alzheimer’s, that they may have been positive?

Dr. Isaacson: “Absolutely. In 2012 we have made great strides in our understanding of AD.  However, we still have a long way to go in terms of understanding which therapies may be more effective in different groups of patients. For example, some drugs may work in patients at risk of developing AD who have not yet had the onset of symptoms (called the pre-clinical stages). We know that AD starts in the brain at least 20-30 years before the onset of symptoms, and as such, preventative strategies are most likely to work when started early.  Also, there is a term called pharmacogenomics, meaning that certain people will be more or less likely to respond to a therapy based on their genetic code. For example, we now know that having one copy of the APOE4 gene may decrease the chances of responding to several therapies. In fact, certain treatments like DHA fish oil, Axona (a medical food), and another vaccine that was recently studied called bapineuzumab showed that patients with certain genes responded better than others without that type of genetic code. Much research needs to be done to clarify these points, and we are not yet at the point where practitioners are able to send blood samples in order to make treatment decisions, but this may change in the future. We wrote an article on this topic called Genetics of Dementia in the Continuum series (American Academy of Neurology, April 2011), which you can review for more detailed information. While we are all excited about the possibility of a drug to one day prevent AD, in the meantime we should all pay close attention to lifestyle changes, like regular exercise and specific dietary changes, to reduce AD risk and improve brain and body health.”

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For more information of the treatment and prevention of AD, including which therapies are more likely to be effective based on the stage of the disease, and in different patient types, read Alzheimer’s Treatment Alzheimer’s Prevention: 2012 Edition,” available on Amazon.com, Kindle, Nook, iBooks and Kobo. Visit: www.TheADplan.com, or in Spanish: www.TheADplan.com/Espanol.

For more information on nutrigenomics and dietary strategies that are grounded in scientific-evidence, visit www.TheAlzheimersDiet.com to request an Email when the new book, The Alzheimer’s Diet: A Step-by-step Nutritional Approach at Memory Loss Prevention and Treatment, is released.

The Alzheimer’s Diet: New Book by Harvard-trained Neurologist & Nutrition Expert, Teaming Up To Fight Alzheimer’s & Prevent Memory Loss

Posted on | October 4, 2012 | No Comments

AVAILABLE 11/1/2012! Harvard-trained Neurologist Dr. Isaacson & Nutrition Expert Dr. Ochner Team Up to Fight Alzheimer’s disease & Prevent Memory Loss, Limited Realease (1000 copies) – The Alzheimer’s Diet: A Step-by-step Nutritional Approach for Memory Loss Treatment and Prevention. Visit www.TheAlzheimersDiet.com to Learn More.

 

For more information of the treatment and prevention of AD, read “Alzheimer’s Treatment Alzheimer’s Prevention: 2012 Edition,” available on Amazon.com, Kindle, Nook, iBooks and Kobo. Visit: www.TheADplan.com, or in Spanish: www.TheADplan.com/Espanol.

Or for Additional Resources and Patient/Caregiver Information, Visit: www.TherapyForMemory.org

 

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Axona for Alzheimer’s disease

Posted on | September 30, 2012 | No Comments

Recently, the first medical food for Alzheimer’s disease was released called Axona. This food is supplied as a powder that is mixed with a liquid and consumed after a big meal (breakfast or lunch) once each day. To read more about the differences between medical foods, drugs (or medications), and supplements for AD, read Alzheimer’s Treatment Alzheimer’s Prevention: A Patient and Family Guide.

The name of this product is Axona, which contains caprylic triglyceride, a medium-chain triglyceride that is broken down by the liver into ketone bodies. Ketone bodies can be used by the brain as an alternative fuel source to glucose, which is the brain’s usual energy supply. It has been known for some time that the brains of patients with AD have a decreased ability to use glucose, and thus ketone bodies may improve cognitive function. Based on the initial study (Henderson, 2009), Axona has been shown to have a positive effect on cognitive function in a specific group of patients (depends on genetic factors). Even more recent evidence shows that roughly 13% of APOE4 negative patients may have a dramatic increase in cognitive functioning (also most likely attributable to genetic factors).

Axona is only available with a prescription and must be used under the supervision of a physician. Since this is a relatively new product, and since medical foods are not commonly used by many physicians, some patients may have difficulty finding a practitioner who is familiar with it. If a patient has difficulty finding a prescriber, there is a list of doctors that have experience with it on the Axona website.

When starting Axona, it is again important to start low and go slow. In my clinical practice, I suggest that my patients start with either a quarter or a half packet per day with food (preferably breakfast or lunch, whichever meal is bigger) for a week and then increase slowly over a week or two to one full packet per day. The powder packet should be mixed with 6–8 ounces of water, meal replacement drink (e.g., Boost/Ensure), or other liquid (like skim milk or juice) to ensure tolerability and must only be taken after a meal. When the drink is being prepared, it is suggested to first pour 6–8 ounces of liquid into a shaker cup (if a patient gets a sample from their physician, there is usually a shaker cup included), and then the powder should be added to the liquid. The combination should then be shaken/blended (rather than stirred) to ensure tolerability. It is important to drink the mixture slowly over 20–30 minutes, and the company provides information printed on the sample box that gives helpful hints on how to improve tolerability.

Many patients find it easier to purchase several shaker cups as this will reduce the need to wash them on a daily basis. Some shaker cups come with mixing spheres or “agitators” that help to mix the powder into a more palatable form (purchase these types if possible).

The Axona sample kits that may be available from physicians have miniature packets that contain one-quarter of the full packet amount that is usually dispensed when a patient fills the prescription. The sample kits allow patients to gradually increase the dose of Axona, thus decreasing the likelihood of side effects when first starting the product. If a sample kit is not available and you instead fill a prescription, physicians may suggest starting at a lower dose. Some physicians suggest a quarter of a packet per day for a few days, then a half packet per day for a few days, then three-quarters of a packet per day for a few days, then increasing to the full packet as tolerated. Other physicians may begin at a half a packet per day for a week, then increasing to the full packet. Regardless of how your physician starts Axona, it is imperative to drink the mixture slowly after a big meal (breakfast or lunch) as described above.

Patients who have a history of milk or soy allergies, diabetic ketoacidosis, poorly controlled diabetes, or a variety of other health conditions should not take Axona. This product is generally safe, but as with all therapies, must be used under the close supervision of a physician. As discussed further in the book, earlier, Axona has been tested in a phase-2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and was shown to be effective for a subset of patients who were negative for the APOE4 gene (see Chapter 21 in Section 3 for more information about APOE4). While genetic testing is only rarely done by physicians, most prescribers try Axona without ordering genetic testing. If after three months the patient continues to decline, most physicians will stop recommending it. In most clinical practices, doctors do not yet perform genetic testing for a variety of reasons (which go beyond the scope of this discussion).

The manufacturer has ongoing clinical trials, which are necessary, and more information can also be found online at the FDA clinical trials website (www.clinicaltrials.gov). Additional information may also be found on the company website. Since Axona is classified as a medical food (and not an FDA-approved drug), some insurance companies may not cover it. In such cases, the manufacturer offers a 20% discount coupon that may be available on the website (www.about-axona.com) or via the physician’s office. Patients can also buy it online for the pice of $69 directly from the company. The cost (after discount) varies from pharmacy to pharmacy, so it is a good idea to check several. If the future clinical trials are positive, the FDA may review these data and approve Axona as a drug. This would open the door to wider insurance coverage for many individuals.

It may be helpful to engage in a cognitively stimulating activity roughly two hours after drinking Axona. By this time, the ketone bodies have traveled to the brain and may give the brain more “fuel” to participate in activities. For example, going to the movies, or listening to a music activity and educational program on CD two hours after administration. Social interaction with family or friends is also a great option.

Cocoa powder for Alzheimer’s: Antioxidants (flavinoids) from dark chocolate improves memory, insulin resistance and blood pressure

Posted on | August 13, 2012 | No Comments

An exciting new study released today showed that patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) who had regular intake of the strong antioxidants found in chocolate (from dark cocoa powder) had improvement in memory function, as well as blood pressure and insuling resistance!

Dr. Isaacson comments “This therapy deserves consideration for patients with both MCI and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as those at risk. I have already told several of my patients to order the exact type of cocoa powder that was proven in this trial to work.”  He also noted “While most dark chocolate has flavinoids that may help to protect the brain, there is also a high amount of saturated fat and sugar that may have negative effects. As such, for both treatment and prevention, I am only recommending this specific dark chocolate powder for my patients, starting at 1 packet per day for 1 week, increasing to 2 packets per day (since that was the intermediate dose studied in the trial), as tolerated and as approved by their primary care physician.”

This study was the first dietary intervention study (highest quality double-blind, placebo-controlled trial) to show regular consumption of cocoa flavinols can improve memory function, most likely due to an improvement in insulin sensitivity. While further study is necessary for both patients with Alzheimer’s disease as well as for those at risk, these are exciting results.

Read the Interview with Dr. Isaacson on WebMD: www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/news/20120813/cocoa-may-help-sharpen-aging-brain

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For the latest comprehensive plan to fight Alzheimer’s disease, read the new 2012 Edition of “Alzheimer’s Treatment Alzheimer’s Prevention: A Patient and Family Guide.” Visit: www.TheADplan.com, or in Spanish: www.TheADplan.com/Espanol for more information. Also available on Kindle, Nook, and iBooks.

 

Non-drug Alzheimer’s Treatments: Music and Light Therapy for Memory loss and Sleep

Posted on | August 2, 2012 | 2 Comments

New research supports the use of Music and Light Therapy in the management of Alzheimer’s disease

Music: El Haj and colleagues studied how listening to music could stimulate memory in Alzheimer’s patients, as well as young and normal adults without memory loss. Participants were asked to remember autobiographical events after being exposed to their own chosen music, and also in silence. Compared to memories in silence, memories evoked in the “music” group were found to be more specific, accompanied by more emotional content and impact on mood, and retrieved quicker.  In addition to listening to familiar music during the daytime, there are now music activity and educational programs available to both stimulate the mind and exercise memory, as well as tranquil sounds for relaxation and sleep.  For more information on research on using music to both delay the onset of and help improve memory loss, read Chapters 9 and 27 in the book, or Click Here.

Light: A new study by Figuiero and colleagues to be published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease showed that tailored light exposure is a viable theraputic option for reducing sleep disturbances in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.  This was the first study to demonstrate that those who experienced lower levels of light exposure during the day also had lower activity levels, and had greater disruption of the natural sleep or “circadian” rhythms.  This was greatest in the Winter months. While we do not yet know the best amount of light exposure to help, therapy could range from going outdoors for 10-15 each day to sitting in front of a light box (fitted with blue LEDs) for a prescribed amount of time. Consider a portable light box or one to keep at home.

For the latest comprehensive plan to fight Alzheimer’s disease, read the new 2012 Edition of “Alzheimer’s Treatment Alzheimer’s Prevention: A Patient and Family Guide.”  Visit: www.TheADplan.com, or in Spanish: www.TheADplan.com/Espanol for more information. Also available on Kindle, Nook, and iBooks.

 

 

Alzheimer’s Risk: If I have a family history, will I get Alzheimer’s disease?

Posted on | August 1, 2012 | No Comments

One of the most common questions that we get asked about AD is “If I have a family history, am I more likely to develop Alzheimer’s?” Before we answer this, let us clarify a few things. In general, Alzheimer’s is a very common condition regardless of whether a person has a family member with the disease. In fact, everyone’s risk of developing AD increases over time because the number-one risk factor is advancing age. That is why we all should start making changes in our lives to reduce this risk!  Most especially, seeing a physician for an evaluation, as well as lifestyle and dietary changes.

That being said, there are specific genes that can be passed on from parents to children that may increase the likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s disease. The good news is that only 6 percent of AD cases are caused by the types of genes that can lead to early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (we will not get into technical detail here, but these genetic mutations include presenilin-1, presenilin-2, and amyloid precursor protein gene mutation). These genes may contribute to the development of AD in patients younger than age sixty, although many younger-onset patients do not end up having these genes.

There is another set of genes that are associated with older-age onset of AD, or late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. The most well studied of these genes is called apolipoprotein epsilon-4 (or commonly referred to as APOE4 [or APOε-4]). Briefly, we get one copy of the APOE gene from our mother and another copy from our father. There are three types of these genes, APOE2, APOE3, and APOE4. If a person has one or more of the APOE4s, the risk of developing AD will increase. However, genetic testing for APOE is not currently recommended. Knowing whether a person has one or more copies of APOE4 does not necessarily help a physician predict if or when a patient will develop AD. Conversely, having one or more copies of APOE2 confers a reduced risk of developing AD.

We still have a long way to go before using genetic testing to help with the pre-symptomatic diagnosis of AD. For these reasons, Dr. Isaacson’s does not recommend genetic testing on family members of Alzheimer’s patients in his clinical practice. Instead, he suggests that all family members focus on a healthy lifestyle plan as detailed in his book ”Alzheimer’s Treatment Alzheimer’s Prevention: 2012 Edition,” available now at www.TheADplan.com.

Keep in mind that there are some changes in thinking skills that occur normally with age. This condition is called age-associated cognitive impairment. Symptoms may include intermittent memory loss, word-finding difficulties, and slowing of the speed of thinking. When cognitive changes are isolated to difficulties with memory, this condition is sometimes referred to as age-related memory loss.

We do not yet have all the answers about what would be considered the “normal” or expected cognitive changes that occur with age. Scientists also have much work to do to more accurately determine whether a person will develop AD instead of conditions like normal age-related memory loss. This is an area where active research is currently being conducted, and is also covered more in the book.

For a review of risk factors for AD, and the science-supported strategies to help both prevent and treat the disease, read “Alzheimer’s Treatment Alzheimer’s Prevention: 2012 Edition,” available now on www.TheADplan.com, Amazon, Kindle, Nook, iBooks & Kobo.

Visit: www.TheADplan.com to learn more, or in Spanish: www.TheADplan.com/Espanolwww.facebook.com/EnfermedadDeAlzheimer

Or for Additional Resources and Patient/Caregiver Information, Visit: www.TherapyForMemory.org.

COMING SOON! Harvard-trained Neurologist &  Nutrition Expert Team Up to Fight Alzheimer’s disease and Prevent Memory Loss – THE ALZHEIMER’S DIET.  Visit www.TheAlzheimersDiet.comto Learn More or Request an Email when the Book is Released

 

TherapyForMemory.org Question of the Month

Posted on | July 31, 2012 | No Comments

This question was submitted via the Ask the Experts page on www.TherapyForMemory.org, a website dedicated to “helping Patients, Caregivers, Family and Healthcare Providers fight memory loss by providing up-to-date information and resources”.  Since it is a common question from both patients and family members, we share their Question/Answer of the Month here for our www.TheADplan.com blog readers. Also, feel free to visit our NEW Alzheimer’s Diet Blog at www.TheADplan.com/alzheimersdietblog to learn more!

Question:

I read on your website about different diet types and eating different foods can influence memory, delay the onset of memory loss or even TREAT alzheimers disease?!?! I asked my mom’s doctor about this and he said there is “nothing” that can be done except for the medicines. He flatly said diet doesnt work. Whats the deal here?

Answer:

This is a great question, and in fact, most doctors are still not aware of the evidence for diet modification in AD since the science is still so new (several dozen high-quality studies haven been published in 2012 alone). When it comes to treatment, there are several recent studies that show that when patients with AD or Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) change their diets significantly (most significantly, decreasing the total amount of cabohydrates that they eat), that memory scores increase! (Craft and colleagues, Archives of Neurology, June 2011) In a study by Krikorian and colleagues (published in Neurobiology of Aging, December 2010), in addition to memory improvements, patients also had improved blood sugar levels, had less insulin resistance and also lost weight. In terms of prevention, there is so much recent data showing that very specific diet changes reduce the chances of developing AD. At the upcoming International Clinical Trials in Alzheimer’s Disease meeting in Monte Carlo (October 29-31, 2012) Dr. Isaacson (University of Miami Miller School of Medicine) and Dr. Ochner (Columbia University) will be presenting the latest research on diet and AD.  Their work will outline several dietary strategies (like the Mediterranean-style diet, decreasing carbohydrates, and specific types of Omega-3 fatty acids) that all have positive evidence.

Now, dietary changes will not work for everyone. Depending on a persons genes (a field called Nutrigenomics), their ethnic background, and other medical conditions, for example, diet may work well for some people but not as well for others.  Our philosophy is that if you can delay the onset of AD by 6 months, a year or even 2 years with healthy lifestyle choices and diet, and in that time frame a cure is finally found, then with diet you have effectively “prevented” AD. When it comes to treatment, if you can improve memory function even by 10 or 20%, or slow down the course even slightly, than that is a win-win for everyone involved not only the patient but the entire family.  Therefore, we are strong advocates for dietary changes as one of the many components of AD treatment and prevention.

NOW AVAILABLE! Harvard-trained Neurologist Dr. Isaacson & Nutrition Expert Dr. Ochner Team Up to Fight Alzheimer’s disease and Prevent Memory Loss – Visit www.TheAlzheimersDiet.com to Learn More, Subscribe to our Free Newsletter, and to Read our NEW Alzheimer’s Diet Blog at www.TheADplan.com/alzheimersdietblog. The book includes an overview of the latest scientific research behind diet for AD treatment and prevention, as well as an expanded 9-Week Diet plan (as first publihsed in the book “Alzheimer’s Treatment Alzheimer’s Prevention: A Patient and Family Guide, 2012 Edition (www.TheADplan.com), along with sample menus, and access to a new online nutrition tracking system.

Alzheimer’s Association Conference – Research News and Highlights (AAIC 2012)

Posted on | July 18, 2012 | No Comments

New and exciting research presented this week at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2012 may lead to several new treatment options in the future.  See the article below for details, but highlights include:

1. Three years of stabilization of Alzheimer’s symptoms with IVIG (Gammagard). While the small number of ptients in the study limits the reliability of the results, a larger study is ongoing an results are expected in the next year or so.

2. A new drug was tested in a trial with 409 people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s showed significant benefits on memory, language, attention and other cognitive abilities.  Many of these patients were already taking FDA-approved drugs, like Exelon patch and Aricept. Further study is needed to confirm these initial results.

3. Light alcohol drinking (1-2 servings per day in men, 1 in women) has generally been considered to have some general health and longer-term cognitive benefits. However, two new studies show that moderate alcohol use in late-life, heavier use earlier in life, transitioning to drinking in late-life, and “binge” drinking in late-life increase risk of cognitive decline.

For more information, visit:
www.sacbee.com/2012/07/18/4639540/newly-reported-research-advances.html
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Or for a 20-step Treatment plan, and 10-step Prevention plan, Read:

 

 

 

 

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About

Harvard-trained Neurologist, Richard S. Isaacson, M.D. currently serves as Associate Professor of Clinical Neurology, Vice Chair of Education, and Education Director of the McKnight Brain Institute in the Department of Neurology at the University of Miami (UM) Miller School of Medicine. He completed his residency in Neurology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, and his medical internship at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, FL. Prior to joining UM, he served as Associate Medical Director of the Wien Center for Alzheimers disease and Memory Disorders at Mount Sinai.

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